Three tips on how to have a better delivery of your baby

We found out that my water broke on November 29, 2018 at around 8 AM. We weren’t even sure if it’s really the amniotic fluid or just a discharge from the evening primrose oil that I took the night before. We didn’t know how to react. Should we panic and rush to the emergency room or stay calm and wait for our doctor’s advice? We went to the labor room at around 11 AM, that’s when we’re informed that my labor had begun.

Here are three tips on how to have a better delivery based on my experience.

HAVE A BIRTH PLAN A TO Z

I always say that my birth plan was to be flexible. What I did when I was still pregnant was to read a lot about giving birth so I’d know my options. I did research about epidural to know the pros and cons, though it’s being discouraged by some. I noticed too that natural birth has become a trend and it already seems like an obsession for some moms. Yes, my doctor and I agreed that we will aim for normal birth. Nonetheless, I kept an open mind to the possibility of a C-Section, because there were ultrasound results that show that Tala might be a big baby. My doctor advised me to not eat lunch and stop drinking water when I was already in labor, so we’ll be prepared if in case we need to do the C-Section. Later, I found out from another mom that she had a bad experience with her emergency C-Section. She was vomiting during the operation, because she was full. I am thankful my doctor made that proactive call.

Back to my labor, I wasn’t dilating as fast as we wanted. At around 7 PM, when the doctor did an internal examination, I was still at 4 cm. Doing a C-section was now the better choice, because Tala had been exposed for more than 11 hours. The chances of her getting an infection was increasing. She was born at 9:32 PM. It was found out that she also had a coil around her foot which may be the reason why she wasn’t able to go down and help me dilate. The ultrasound only showed one coil around her neck which should still be safe for normal delivery. Had I wanted to push through with a natural birth because that’s my birth plan A, who knows what might have gone wrong.

Point is, it’s important to know the options, understand the advantages and disadvantages, and accept if and when intervention is necessary. In reality, no one has control over what will happen during labor. The ultimate birth plan is to know what needs to be done when it needs to be done for your safety and your baby’s.

ALWAYS ASK QUESTIONS

Don’t be ashamed of not knowing. Your doctor, experts are there to give you advice. It’s best to ask them about everything no matter how stupid the question sounds. It’s the doctor’s job to explain to you and help you understand. If your doctor seems like they are not being thorough, then insist on getting an elaborate explanation, or you might consider consulting with a new one. I’m fortunate that my doctor was patient with explaining things to me.

The labor room can be pretty busy. Depends on how many mothers are going in labor at the same time. Nurses will do standard procedures on you. It’s already routine. They know what they’re doing, you don’t, so go ahead and ask. When a nurse would come up to me and inject something, I’d ask what it is for. Some offer information, some don’t. Bottom line is, you need to know.

TRUST YOUR BODY AND YOUR BABY

If you have normal pregnancy, know that our body is designed to carry and give birth to babies. And your baby will know when it’s time to come out to the world. Some moms talk about the pain of giving birth, sometimes way too much, and it can make the expecting ones more nervous than necessary. Every pregnancy is different and it can be your choice to feel less scared and more prepared. My way was to keep myself well-informed of all the necessary things. Think about this, during labor cervical dilation happens gradually from 1 cm to 10 cm. It is not a sudden 10 cm. So it’s nature’s way, it’s the body’s way to ease you into giving birth.

Choose whatever you think is best for you and your baby with the guidance of your doctor, of course. Wishing you happy and safe delivery mommies!